... New, and could use some help. Thanks!
  • I have my BFF wedding, who I've known since we were both three, her colors are white and burgundy. It's been difficult to find already made dresses in the shade she wants. Easy to find fabric, but not ready made dresses. After much planning, and throwing different ideas we decided to do lace dresses and dye them according to one bridesmaid already purchased dress. Anyways, seems like now people are doing their own thing. I found this brand which matches the color perfectly and I have a black lace dress I love. Only issue is I do not know what type of fabric it is, I have read you dye them according to material. I also read this was great dye for both organic and synthetic material. Is this true? Help!
  • Oh, the wedding is in two weeks. I am flying out from California to Michigan for it.
  • For formal dresses, it's a much better idea to have a dressmaker run up the dresses you want from ready-dyed fabric.

    Which dye are you talking about, a "great dye for both organic and synthetic material"? There is no single dye that works on both natural and synthetic fibers, so I think you're probably thinking about a fabric paint, such as Dye-Na-Flow. It's a non-starter of an idea, though, because, although Dye-Na-Flow is a good fabric paint, no fabric paint can give you a perfectly even, solid color. You can dye some natural and synthetic-fiber fabrics together by boiling them in a HUGE cooking pot (which you'll never use for food again) with both iDye (for cotton and rayon) and iDye Poly (for polyester), but this is not likely to be the best choice for a formal dress.

    You MUST find out is the exact fiber content of the dresses before you even consider dyeing them. Nylon requires different conditions than polyester. Linings shrink differently than overdresses. Are the dresses washable in hot water? If not, they won't survive the hot or boiling water used for dyeing synthetics.

    If you want to buy a dress to dye, your results will be much better if you buy a dress that is made and sold for dyeing, such as the ones sold by Dharma Trading Company. Don't buy off-the-rack dresses that are not sold for the purpose of dyeing. See this link for some good choices: http://www.dharmatrading.com/html/eng/3299-AA.shtml

    -Paula

    --
    Paula E. Burch, Ph.D.
    hand dyeing FAQ, dyeing instructions, book reviews:
    http://www.pburch.net/dyeing.shtml
    please join the dye forum: http://www.pburch.net/forum
  • http://www.chictopia.com/photo/show/297879-Classic+lace+dress-black-forever-21-dress. That is the dress. Not very formal. Unfortunately, it doesn't say either. The jacquard lumiere fabric paint in burgundy is the one I looked up. I read in the description is was great for both organic and synthetic materials. I thought I would ask beforehand. I have machine washed the dress iin hot water before on accident, and it survived.
  • Thank you, for your reply!
  • Wait, it's a black dress? You can't change its color. Dye will not even show on black fabric, because dye is transparent. If you want to dye a dress, start with a white one.

    You can add some nice highlights with a metallic fabric paint like Lumiere, but you can't change the overall color of the whole dress without encrusting it thickly with the fabric paint. You can't dye a dress a solid color using fabric paint, because you inevitably end up with more color in some places and less in others.

    -Paula

    --
    Paula E. Burch, Ph.D.
    hand dyeing FAQ, dyeing instructions, book reviews:
    http://www.pburch.net/dyeing.shtml
    please join the dye forum: http://www.pburch.net/forum
  • So I have decided to make the same dress myself. What fabrics would be needed to be able to use the Jacquard Lumiere in Burgundy? Would it be smarter to dye the fabric before making the dress itself?
  • So it is not a dye, and it is a paint? Back to trying to find the exact shade.
  • You might be able to find a fabric in the exact color you like, when you go fabric shopping. If not, then choose an easily dyeable fabric.

    Silk is one of the best fabrics to dye. Silk satin is really nice, much nicer than polyester satin, and so much easier to dye. You can dye it with Procion MX dye or with acid dye, your choice. Satin is difficult to sew with unless you're already an expert at sewing, though.

    Cotton, rayon, and other cellulose fabrics are extremely easy to dye. You can dye them with Procion MX dye at room temperature. This is the best choice for a beginner to dye.

    Nylon can be dyed with acid dyes, but nylon/spandex is a much bigger problem, because acid dyes require heat, and spandex is easily damaged by heat. A lot of laces are made from nylon, but be careful to check the end of the bolt, because some laces are made of polyester, which you don't want for this project.

    Don't buy any polyester for dyeing. It's completely doable if you haven't sewn it into a dress yet, but it's more difficult for a beginning dyer, and there's a problem with the bad smell of the color intensifier you need to use on polyester, and you absolutely must boil polyester, instead of dyeing it in the washing machine. Since you're a novice at dyeing, I recommend you choose a fabric that's made of a more easily dyeable fiber.

    -Paula

    --
    Paula E. Burch, Ph.D.
    hand dyeing FAQ, dyeing instructions, book reviews:
    http://www.pburch.net/dyeing.shtml
    please join the dye forum: http://www.pburch.net/forum