help please, dying antique fabric, color too pale; can I re-dye?
  • I just used Jacquard 'salmon' to dye an 1840 'linsey woolsey' petticoat. It was my first time using these dyes, which I am liking so far! I dyed it by hand in a pot outside, rather than in the machine, due to the age of the piece. I researched and followed directions explicitly, mixing and straining the dye, and pre-washing the piece in Syntrapol and water. I used approxiamately 5 gal. of water, and 2 little bottles of the salmon dye powder. This petticoat (skirt) is hand quilted, and is comprised of probably a total of 3 yards of fabric. It is APPRX. 1 1/2 pounds DRY, I am guessing. The skirt dyed very evenly, with no 'freckling', uneven dying, etc. The problem? Although it is a lovely salmon color, it is rather pale. I stirred it in the dyebath, and it was in there for over an hour. (Yes, I used vinegar, and some salt, at appropriate times). I rinsed in cold water several times, and then washed it again gently with Synthrapol. It didn't LOSE color; it just seemed that it didn't take up as much as I had hoped. I am a reenactor, and am going to wear this. I would like to RE-DYE it, to see if I could deepen the color. I fear I perhaps used too little dye. Is it a waste of time to do this? Is there a chance, that if I try ONE more time, using the 8 oz. size of dye, the color may be deeper, as it was on a small square of muslin I experimented on in a cup of the dye earlier???
    I do not want to machine dye this, and had good luck with color even-ness, and I will only be willing to try this ONCE more on the old fabric, IF there is a chance of getting the color a bit deeper. The only thing I did not try was adding soda ash. Any help with this would be appreciate. I plan on trying this again late this week---(maybe 8/5).
    Thank you.
  • countrylady said:
    I just used Jacquard 'salmon'
    What kind of dye did you use? Jacquard Products sells a wide range of types of dye, which are suitable for entirely different fibers, and which require entirely different recipes. Did you use acid dye, iDye direct dye, iDye Poly disperse dye, Procion MX fiber reactive dye, or what?

    -Paula
  • I'm presuming that you are referring to the Jacquard Acid dye Salmon #607, which is a dye for protein fibers such as silk and wool. I'm also presuming that your coat is a combination of cellulose fiber (cotton, linen, rayon etc) and wool (based on a quick internet search of "linsey woolen"). Acid dyes are the correct dye for wool, but are not the correct dye for cotton.

    There are two options available. The first is to do a dyeing using the Acid dyes to dye the wool fiber--which you've already done-- and then do a second dyebath with the Procion MX dyes to dye the cotton fiber. However, the colors are not the same from one line to the next, so you'll have to experiment with some Procion MX colors and possibly do some color mixing to achieve the color that you are looking for.

    The second option would be to use a color remover to try to remove the acid dye and then do a 2 dyebath procedure using a color in the Procion MX line (again the color range is different from line to line). First, dye it using the instructions for cellulose fibers (using soda ash) and then rinse and wash and redye it using the instructions for protein fibers (using vinegar). Each type of fiber dyes differently so there could be shade variations between the wool and the cotton.

    Instructions are both the acid dyes and Procion MX downloadable from our website. Hope this information helps.