Dyeing A Poly/Cotton Blend Olive Denim Jacket== Pic Included
  • Hello,
    I purchased the following dark olive (the picture is a little lighter that the actual jacket) denim jacket. The material composition is:
    51% Polyester, 47% Cotton, & 2% Spandex

    The inside of the jacket is a bright green (fleece).

    I want to dye this jacket indigo so that it looks like a regular dark
    denim. The IDye Poly only comes in a regular blue. My question is
    about choosing the IDye natural since there are various blue choices.

    Which of the following blues added with the IDye Poly Blue would
    insure a dark indigo denim color?

    Gun Metal (seems gray blue)
    Navy
    Brilliant Blue
    Royal Blue (I don't think this one will do)

    Which steps should I take first? Do I need to use a color remover especially since the color I'll be dyeing the jacket with will be darker than the current color?






    image
  • I'd go with the Navy - and it will be important to use the stove top method (described in full on the inside of the dye packet) to ensure the darkest possible colors.
    If it were me, I'd not bother with removing the color, although I'm relatively unperturbed when colors don't come out just the way I'd envisioned. The main reason I'd forgo the color removing step is that it would mean one more very hot (simmering) bath that the jacket would have to withstand and that 2% spandex is not going to like the very hot water.
    hope this helps.
    have fun!
    anet
  • Thanks, Anet. image

    A have a few more questions:

    How large of a dye pot would I need? Any particular metals to look out for?

    Also, how many packets of dye would I need of both the iDye Poly Blue and iDye Natural Navy? It's a heavy jacket.
  • Hi there,

    You'll want the pot to be big enough to allow the jacket to move freely in the bath. Enamel, stainless steel or aluminum are all acceptable metals. My favorite dye pot is an old enamel canning pot I found at a second hand store. We recommend you never use your cooking utensils for dyeing.
    The amount of dye is determined by the weight of the jacket. One dye packet will dye 2-3 pounds of fiber, so you should be fine with one each of the iDye and iDye Poly.
    BTW - great jacket!

    anet
  • I don't think it's a good idea to dye this jacket. It looks wonderful. http://www.webhostingrvw.com/.
  • I haven't gotten either dyes yet so I haven't dyed the jacket. Why do you suggest I not dye it? You think the process will ruin it? Thanks for the complement.

    fusion said:
    I don't think it's a good idea to dye this jacket. It looks wonderful.
  • For the suggestions and the complement. I love the shape/style of the jacket just wish it were indigo denim.

    anet said:
    Hi there,

    You'll want the pot to be big enough to allow the jacket to move freely in the bath. Enamel, stainless steel or aluminum are all acceptable metals. My favorite dye pot is an old enamel canning pot I found at a second hand store. We recommend you never use your cooking utensils for dyeing.
    The amount of dye is determined by the weight of the jacket. One dye packet will dye 2-3 pounds of fiber, so you should be fine with one each of the iDye and iDye Poly.
    BTW - great jacket!

    anet