How Are Interference Colors Different?
  • I've read that interference colors show up better on black or other dark colors. But does Interference Gold, for example, really look a LOT different on black than Brilliant Gold? I mix Pearl Ex powders with liquids and spray onto my paper. Will i see a lotmore gold"pigment" with Brilliant Goldthan InterferenceGold? I already have Brilliant Gold and don't want to spend the additional money right now if there's no difference.

    I have Red Russet. How does it differ from Interference red? I really cannot see the difference in the samples online.

    I have True Blue (looks pale lavender in jar) and Turquoise (looks like royal blue in jar). How do these compare to Interference Blue when sprayed onblack paper? Anyone know? They look the same on my computer screen.

    Thanks!
  • Hi,

    Interference color is often seen in the rainbow effect created by a thin layer of oil on the surface of water. Whenever light strikes a boundary between two materials of different densities, the light will either be reflected or refracted. These pigments are transparent. The effect is quite different from the other iridescent colors which are opaque.

    Celia
  • Celia Buchanan said:
    Hi,

    Interference color is often seen in the rainbow effect created by a thin layer of oil on the surface of water. Whenever light strikes a boundary between two materials of different densities, the light will either be reflected or refracted. These pigments are transparent. The effect is quite different from the other iridescent colors which are opaque.

    Celia


    So then if an interference color is used on a light colored background, light is reflected from the background color and masks the effect of the interference pigments, but if used on a dark background where less light is reflected, then you'll see the interference color better because IT is reflecting most of the light, instead of the background. Correct?